Learn Ruby programming - 64th batch

Registrations are now open for RubyLearning’s long-running and popular Ruby programming course. This is an intensive, online course for beginners that helps you get started with Ruby programming. The course starts on Saturday, 5 December 2015 and runs for seven weeks. Course Fee and Discount Please create a new account first and then pay US $44.95 by clicking on the PayPal button Note: If you do not have a PayPal account and would like to pay by credit card on PayPal then do email me at satish [at] rubylearning.org.

Felipe Elias Philipp Winner RPCFN - 1 (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 8th Oct. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. In this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Felipe Elias Philipp of Brazil, winner of the first-ever Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies. Satish Welcome Felipe and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self? Felipe Thanks Satish for the opportunity.

RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight - 2 Reprint

Note: This article first appeared on 8th Oct. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) By Chris Strom Thank you for the very encouraging response to the first-ever “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)“. The second Ruby challenge is from Chris Strom. About Chris Strom Chris Strom (twitter / blog) in his day job, is the Director of Software Engineering for mdlogix, a small company in Baltimore, Maryland.

RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (Reprint)

RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies Note: This article first appeared on 20th Sept. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly (every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” that starts on Friday, 25th Sept. 2009. What Is The RPCFN? The RPCFN is a fortnightly (every 14 days) programming challenge for Ruby Newbies in the spirit of the Ruby Quiz.

RPCFN: Shift Subtitle Reprint

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Shift Subtitle (#1) By Fabio Akita Note: This article first appeared on 24th Sept. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly ( bi-weekly / every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” in Ruby. Thanks to YOU, the Ruby community, people like Fabio Akita and companies like Locaweb who make all of this possible.

What are the Twelve Rules of Sinatra? (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 19th July. 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. The Twelve Rules of Sinatra The Twelve Rules of Sinatra: Download this as a Free Report. Recently, I was reading Scott Adams’ (of Dilbert fame) blog post “Rule of Twelve” where he stated: The Rule of Twelve states that if you know twelve concepts about a given topic you will look like an expert to people who only know two or three.

20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra - Do you? (Reprint)

Note: This first appeared on 29th June 2009 and is being reprinted as the original is not accessible. 20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra – Do you? With Sinatra you can quickly create your own tiny web-applications in Ruby and write lots of small services. RubyLearning caught up with some Rubyists working with Sinatra and asked them as to why, how and where they use Sinatra. Aaron Quint>> I’ve been using Sinatra all over the place.

Corey Donohoe: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Note: We are re-printing this blog post that appeared on 6th July 2009, as the original post is not accessible. Welcome to the first installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Follow 10+ Rubyists using Sinatra on Twitter (Reprint)

Note: This first appeared on 24th June 2009 and is being reprinted as the original is not accessible. What’s Twitter? The New York Times says: Twitter is a simple messaging service that you’ve either heard about a lot or not at all. Either way, it’s a fun and useful tool, well worth trying if you want to reach potential and existing customers, employees or employers. List of Rubyists Using Sinatra This list of over 10 Rubyists using Sinatra, is in alphabetical order, with a link to their Twitter profile.

Interview: Aaron Quint on Sinatra (Reprint)

Note: This article first appeared on 20th March 2009 but the original is not accessible; hence the reprint. On the eve of the first ever online “Introduction to Sinatra” course, Satish Talim of RubyLearning caught up with Aaron Quint and talked to him on Sinatra, in this interview. Satish Talim Welcome, Aaron and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self?

Karel Minarik: How do I learn and master Sinatra? (Reprint)

Note: This is reprint of the blog post that appeared on 13th July 2009, as the original is not accessible. Welcome to the fourth installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Little Functional Programming Lexicon

This guest post is by Elise Huard, who is working as a freelance software engineer. She has 15 years of software under her belt and is keen on providing experienced advice as well as coding help. She has programmed in Ruby for 6 years before turning to Clojure and Haskell, and enjoys exploring the world of functional programming.

Routing Basics: Ruby on Rails for Front-End Developers

Routing Basics: Ruby on Rails for Front-End Developers This guest post is by Miles Matthias, who in between trips and sips, usually with planes and bourbon, enjoys talking to people about difficult challenges and tapping on his keyboard to help solve them. He moved to Boulder in January of 2012, after meeting his future wife and picking up degrees in Computer Science and Information Assurance in Omaha, Nebraska. Boulder was his ninth move after growing up in Virginia, Kansas, Illinois, and Indiana, and would be more than happy if Colorado became his permanent home.

From Lousy to Beautiful

This guest post is by James Schorr, who has been developing software since 1999. He is the owner of an IT consulting company, Enspiren IT Consulting, LLC. He lives with his lovely wife, Tara, and their children in Kansas City, Missouri. James spends a lot of time writing code in many languages, doing IT security audits, and has a passion for Ruby on Rails in particular. He also loves spending time with his family, playing chess, going to the shooting range, hiking, fishing, and investing.

Sinatra and Google Currency API - Part 2

Sinatra and Google Currency API – Part 2 This guest post is by Girish Sonawane, a self-taught programmer. He came across Ruby in 2008 and has since been working full-time on Ruby. He worked as a Rails freelancer and later co-founded Cube Root, an exclusive Ruby on Rails software boutique catering to outsourced work. His interests are everything related to technology or science. You can reach him at girish@cuberoot.in or via twitter @girishso.

Sinatra: Some Questions from Ruby Newbies

Darren Jones in his excellent book Jump Start Sinatra says “Since its release in 2007, Sinatra has quickly gained in popularity in the Ruby web community due to its elegant simplicity and classy syntax. Everybody who uses it falls in love with its elegant simplicity and classy syntax.” RubyLearning will be conducting a “free” (i.e. pay if you like) online course on Sinatra from 7th Sept. 2013 and many of the would-be participants (mostly Ruby newbies) would have a plethora of questions related to Sinatra.

All about Struct

All about Struct This guest post is by Steve Klabnik. Steve is a Rubyist, writer, and teaches Ruby and Rails classes with Jumpstart Lab. He maintains Draper, Hackety Hack, and Shoes, and\ contributes to Rails from time to time. One of my favorite classes in Ruby is Struct, but I feel like many Rubyists don’t know when to take advantage of it. The standard library has a lot of junk in it, but Struct and OStruct are super awesome.

The 5 Most Popular Articles of 2011 on RubyLearning

(Based on Twitter Re-tweets) The year 2011 saw RubyLearning’s awesome guest authors write and share their knowledge with others. If you missed any of these useful articles then here’s the roundup of the 5 most popular articles of 2011 on RubyLearning. Enjoy! Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue… I’m so confused! Avdi Grimm explains the usage of Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue in the Ruby programming language. You’ve probably noticed that Ruby has throw and catch… but they don’t seem to be used the way you’re used to in other languages!

Let's Talk About Conditional Expressions

This guest post is by Evan Light a test-obsessed developer, the author of several rarely used gems, and the curator of Ruby DCamp. When he’s not a talking head at conferences, he’s usually working at home as a freelance developer remotely mentoring a developer, working for one or more startups, playing with open source, keeping his wife and four cats company, hacking nonsensically, talking at people on the internet, and/or attempting to lose weight (or any combination of the above).

Do you ponder what to name things in your code?

This guest post is by Evan Light a test-obsessed developer, the author of several rarely used gems, and the curator of Ruby DCamp. When he’s not a talking head at conferences, he’s usually working at home as a freelance developer remotely mentoring a developer, working for one or more startups, playing with open source, keeping his wife and four cats company, hacking nonsensically, talking at people on the internet, and/or attempting to lose weight (or any combination of the above).

Questions on Ruby? Ask An Expert at RubyLearning

Questions on Ruby? Ask An Expert at RubyLearning RubyLearning is happy to announce the start of a series of blog posts titled “Ask An Expert”. We are assembling experts in various areas of Ruby programming who will answer your questions as a blog post here. To begin with, some of the experts who have agreed to answer your questions are: Gautam Rege on Ruby with MongoDB, Mongo, MongoMapper and Mongoid Gonçalo Silva on Ruby/Rails performance Sau Sheong Chang on Sinatra Sethupathi Asokan on the Ruby devise gem Staffan Nöteberg on Ruby regex Steve Klabnik on Testing in Ruby I am sure there are more Ruby experts to follow.

My Ruby Book now available in .mobi and .epub formats

My Ruby Book now available in .mobi and .epub formats My Ruby book has been available since 2006 in .pdf format. It’s now available, completely updated for Ruby 1.9, in .mobi and .epub formats. The Ruby eBook covers Ruby 1.9 and has all the Core Ruby programming topics on the RubyLearning.com site. This Ruby eBook, is the ideal companion for students in the Online Ruby Class at RubyLearning.org and provides an overview of Ruby programming.

Do you know Ruby Doctest?

This guest post is by Victor Goff, who enjoys mentoring Ruby at RubyLearning.org since 2008.

Do you know how to write an internal DSL in Ruby?

Almost all Ruby programming newbies would love to get their hands wet writing a Ruby DSL. This article explains how you can write a simple Ruby DSL. Introduction A Domain-Specific Language (DSL) is a (usually small) programming or description language designed for a fairly narrow purpose. DSLs are targeted at end users or domain specialists who are not expert programmers. Martin Fowler classifies DSLs into two styles – external and internal.

Top 3 Posts for July 2011 on RubyLearning

(Based on Google Analytics) In case you missed them, here’s the roundup of the Top 3 posts for July 2011 on RubyLearning. Enjoy! 1. Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue… I’m so confused! Avdi Grimm explains the usage of Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue in the Ruby programming language. One of the aspects of Ruby that often confuses newbies coming from other languages is that it has both throw and catch and raise and rescue statements.

How do I test my code with Minitest?

How do I test my code with Minitest? This guest post is by Steve Klabnik, who is a software craftsman, writer, and former startup CTO. Steve tries to keep his Ruby consulting hours down so that he can focus on maintaining Hackety Hack and being a core member of Team Shoes, as well as writing regularly for multiple blogs. Programming is an interesting activity. Everyone has their favorite metaphor that really explains what programming means to them.

How Can We Develop For Tomorrow's Needs?

How Can We Develop For Tomorrow’s Needs? This guest post is by James Schorr, who has been developing software since 1999. He is the owner of an IT consulting company, Enspiren IT Consulting, LLC. He lives with his lovely wife, Tara, and their children in Kansas City, Missouri. James spends a lot of time writing code in many languages, doing IT security audits, and has a passion for Ruby on Rails in particular.

Why don't you use and review these useful Ruby Gems?

Showcasing some Ruby Gems from developers like you and me Why don’t you try out some of the Ruby Gems mentioned below, built by developers like you and me, and review them? Maybe there are some real ‘hidden’ gems out there, wanting to be exposed! ascii-data-tools developed by Jake Benilov. In his own words – “It provides a suite of tools for identifying, reading, enriching and editing ASCII data records. Such records are commonly used for data transfer within the banking (e.g.

Cryptography Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying, and Love AES

Cryptography Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying, and Love AES This guest post is by Phillip Gawlowski, who is living in the German wilderness of Oberberg near Cologne. Phillip spends his time writing Ruby as a hobby just for fun. He tries to make life a little easier for himself and for others when he is crazy enough to release his code as open source. He’s neither famous nor rich, but likes it that way (most of the time).

Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue- I'm so confused!

Throw, Catch, Raise, Rescue… I’m so confused! This guest post is by Avdi Grimm, who is the author of “Exceptional Ruby“, an in-depth guide to exceptions and failure handling in Ruby. RubyLearning readers can get a $3 discount on the book by using code RUBYLEARN. Avdi has been hacking Ruby code for 10 years, and is still loving it. He is chief aeronaut at ShipRise, a consultancy specializing in sustainable software development and in helping geographically dispersed teams work more effectively.

How do I smell Ruby code?

How do I smell Ruby code? Understanding the worst of code This guest post is by Timon Vonk, who is a self-employed Ruby enthusiast and standard nerd with an edge. He has worked with Ruby for several years, but is well-known with many other (programming) languages. Also likes martial arts, loud music, varying quantities of booze and a good scotch. Introduction Writing bad code isn’t a bad thing. Not understanding the problem you’re trying to solve any better after having written that piece of code is.

How do I make a command-line tool in Ruby?

How do I make a command-line tool in Ruby? This guest post is by Allen Wei, who works as Senior Ruby On Rails Engineer for Seravia, in Beijing. He is very enthusiastic about Ruby. He started using Ruby after several years of using Java, .NET and never came back to them. When he has some spare time, he develops Ruby gems, holds tech sessions, and shares his experience in his blog.

The 5 Most Popular Articles of 2010 on RubyLearning

(Based on Twitter Re-tweets) The year 2010 saw RubyLearning’s awesome guest authors write and share their knowledge with others. If you missed any of these useful articles then here’s the roundup of the 5 most popular articles of 2010 on RubyLearning. Enjoy! Do You Enjoy Your Code Quality? James M. Schorr gives real-world tips on how to enjoy crafting software by improving the quality of your code and your development habits.

Being Awesome with the MongoDB Ruby Driver

This guest post is by Ethan Gunderson, who is a software developer living in Chicago. By day he is a developer at

How do I keep multiple Ruby projects separate?

How do I keep multiple Ruby projects separate? This guest post is by Steve Klabnik, who is a software craftsman, writer, and former startup CTO. Steve tries to keep his Ruby consulting hours down so that he can focus on maintaining Hackety Hack and being a core member of Team Shoes, as well as writing regularly for multiple blogs. If you’re anything like me, you’re already starting a new project immediately after wrapping up the last one.

Getting started with Heroku

Getting started with Heroku This guest post is by Ben Scofield, who is Heroku’s developer advocate, responsible for listening to the tens of thousands of developers deploying their Ruby applications to the cloud. He’s spoken at many conferences around the world, and in 2010 became the co-chair for RailsConf. Introduction Heroku has been in the news a lot lately, and it’s been a popular choice for Ruby application developers for a few years.If you haven’t worked with it before, here’s your chance — it’s designed to be as painless as possible to get going, and to give a powerful, stable, and scalable platform for your code.

Ruby gems — what, why and how

Ruby gems — what, why and how

This guest post is by Gonçalo Silva, who is a full-time Ruby on Rails developer at escolinhas.pt and has participated in the Ruby Summer of Code 2010. He loves and contributes to many open-source projects, being a fan of Linux, Ruby and Android. He likes to call himself a hacker, but that’s just an excuse for being in front of the computer all the time. Oh, and he tweets at @goncalossilva.

My Ruby Regrets

My Ruby Regrets

This guest post is by Jeff Langr, who has developed software for thirty years, mastering many other languages (including Smalltalk, C++, Java, and currently C#), but just not Ruby and Python… yet. (Ever?) He owns the consulting and training company

How do I build DSLs with yield and instance_eval?

This guest post is by Michael Bleigh, a Rubyist developing web applications and more for Intridea from his hometown of Kansas City. He is a prolific member of the open-source and Ruby communities, releasing such projects as

How does one effectively combine Ruby with Git for source control?

This guest post is by Erik Andrejko, a software developer living in San Francisco who spends his days working on web applications and solving data mining and machine learning problems

Don't Know Metaprogramming In Ruby?

This guest post is by Gavin Morrice, Managing Director of Katana Code Ltd., a software boutique based in Edinburgh, Scotland. He likes sharing Rails tips

Does Ruby Have Too Many Equality Tests?

Does Ruby Have Too Many Equality Tests? This guest post is by Eric Anderson, who develops web-based applications for small businesses though his company Pixelware, LLC in Atlanta, GA. He also runs SaveYourCall.com which allows people to record phone calls from any phone without the need for any complicated hardware. You probably started using == out of habit from other languages. It seems to work and that seems good enough. But then you might start seeing ===, =~, eql?

Why Use Single Sign-in Solutions in Rails?

Why Use Single Sign-in Solutions in Rails? This guest post is by Omar A. Mekky, a software developer living in Cairo, Egypt. His interests are every thing related to technology, sports or science. He is a partner in Mash Ltd. in Egypt and enjoys writing about Rails from time to time. Contact Omar at cousine.me or via twitter @cousine. Single sign-in solutions are becoming all popular and practical today. In this article we will see how we can approach this problem by building a simple restful provider and consumer using Authentasaurus on Rails.

Do YOU know Resque?

How does your code smell?

How does your code smell? This guest post is by Dr. Kevin Rutherford, a UK-based agile/XP coach, developer and project leader, with over 25 years experience in software development. He is also the founder of AgileNorth and XP-Manchester. Contact him via http://www.kevinrutherford.co.uk. I expect you’re a conscientious modern developer. You write your code using test-driven or behaviour-driven development, and you never write a line of production code unless it is needed in order to make a test pass.

Do You Understand Ruby's Objects, Messages and Blocks?

This guest post is by Ed Howland, an independent consultant who has worked in Ruby and RoR for more than 5 years, since the 0.13 days of Rails. He has over 22 years in the software development industry

Do you know what's new in Ruby 1.9?

This guest post is by Carlo Pecchia, who is an IT engineer mainly interested on agile methodologies and “good practices” for developing large and complex systems. He is also interested in web architectures and emerging programming languages.

The value of a personal bug log

The value of a personal bug log This guest post is by Brian Tarbox, who is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Motorola where he works on Video On Demand Systems. He also blogs about applying a Wabi Sabi approach to software, cognition and philosophy at briantarbox.blogspot.com. He is a regular contributor to the Pragmatic Programmer magazine. His open source project for converting computer log files to music just won an Oracle Duke’s Choice award.

Do You Enjoy Your Code Quality?

This guest post is by James Schorr, who has been developing software since 1999. He is the owner of an IT consulting company, Enspiren IT Consulting, LLC.  He lives with his lovely wife, Tara, and their children in Kansas City, Missouri. James spends a lot of time writing code in many languages, doing IT security audits, and has a passion for Ruby on Rails in particular. He also loves

Hampton Catlin on Haml

Does ROR deployment deprive YOU of your sleep?

This guest post is contributed by Fabio Akita, who works as Project Manager for GoNow Tecnologia, in Brazil, leading Ruby on Rails projects. He worked for Locaweb, the largest web hosting company in Latin America where he helped implement the support for Rails in a shared web hosting for the first time. He and Locaweb also joined forces to create the

Do YOU know Ruby's "Chainsaw" method?

This guest post is contributed by Paolo Perrotta, a freelance geek, currently coaching agile teams for a large phone company. He also wrotes

Gem Sawyer, Modern Day Ruby Warrior

An Introduction to Outside-in Development

This guest post is contributed by Harold Giménez, who is a web developer with the crew at thoughtbot, where he spends his days working with Rails and writing open source software. He’s also involved with

Ruby Forensics

This guest post is contributed by Elise Huard, who is based in Brussels, Belgium and is the owner of

An introduction to eventmachine, and how to avoid callback spaghetti

This guest post is contributed by Martyn Loughran, who works at New Bamboo in London where he builds some very cool apps like

RPCFN: Japanese Mosaic Problem - 14

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

RPCFN: Japanese Mosaic Problem (#14)

– By Joseph Wilk

About Joseph Wilk

Joseph
Wilk Joseph Wilk is a member of the core development team for Cucumber. He has been developing for the web for over 10 years

The Testing Mindset

This guest post is contributed by Noel Rappin, who is a Senior Consultant with Obtiva, and has been a professional web developer for a dozen years. He is the author of four technical books. The most recent, Rails Test Prescriptions

An Introduction to Desktop Apps with Ruby

This guest post is contributed by Martin Sadler, who has over 10 years experience in the web development industry working with a range of successful high profile businesses, public sector organisations, and individuals. He is best known in the Ruby community as the creator of

The Ruby movement

This guest post is contributed by Matt Aimonetti, a Senior Engineer at Sony Playstation in San Diego, CA. Matt has been active in the Ruby community for many years, he developed or contributed to a lot OSS libraries and frameworks, spoke at users groups and conferences in the U.S. and abroad. Working with startups, fortune 100 companies and traditional companies, he had the opportunity

Almost everything is an object (and everything is almost an object!)

This guest post is contributed by David A. Black, a Senior Developer with Cyrus Innovation, Inc. David has been programming in Ruby for ten years, and is the author of

So, you're new to Ruby!

This guest post is contributed by Javier Cicchelli, a Software Engineer at Rock & Code, the Software and Marketing communications shop that rocks! Currently, they are doing their dirty deeds and conducting their high voltage operations in the (in)famous Red Light District in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Some four years ago, he started developing all the symptoms of a peculiar case of programmer’s schizophrenia. It all happened when

Incorporating Web APIs to spark computer programming exercises

This guest post is contributed by Karmen Blake, who is a software developer for Wildfireapp, focused on creating apps to better help companies integrate branded interactive campaigns with viral features of the social web. Karmen has over 10 years of experience in software development

14 Ways To Have Fun Coding Ruby

This guest post is contributed by Jeff Schoolcraft, who runs The Queue Incorporated a freelance consultancy that provides custom software development in Ruby, Rails and iOS. He produces screencasts with his partner, Istvan Hoka, at BDDCasts. When he’s not building his business he’s trying to keep up with

Writing modular web applications with Rack

Writing modular web applications with Rack

This guest post is contributed by Sau Sheong Chang, who is currently the Director of the Applied Cloud Computing Lab, in HP Labs Singapore.

How to Learn Ruby (or any programming language)

This guest post is contributed by Geoffrey Grosenbach, who designs, produces, and publishes the acclaimed

Ruby Gurus to blog on RubyLearning

Ruby Gurus to blog on RubyLearning

RubyLearning is happy to announce that the following Ruby Gurus would be individually writing a guest blog post here starting 20th Sept. 2010. The focus of the blog post would be towards Ruby Newbies. These gurus are:

Programming Challenge for Newbies in Clojure and Python too?

Programming Challenge for Newbies in Clojure and Python too? RubyLearning has been conducting the monthly Ruby Programming Challenge for Newbies for over a year now and so far 12 challenges have been completed. The 13th challenge is in progress. All this was possible due to the extensive support we got from Rubyists across the world. Also, you all indicated that we continue with these challenges in the months to come. Recently, my colleague Dhananjay Nene posted a Python based solution to the 13th Ruby challenge.

RPCFN: Economics 101 - 13

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Economics 101 (#13) – By Dr. Bruce Scharlau About Dr. Bruce Scharlau In Dr. Bruce’s own words: “I’ve been using and teaching Ruby since trying out the cookbook example in the summer of 2006. As soon as I saw how much easier it all was with Ruby and Rails, I was hooked. I now try to do as much with Ruby as I can with my teaching and own work.

Ruby Programming and Education: A Match Made in Heaven

Ruby programming has received much attention in the past decade or so, especially with the advent of Ruby on Rails in 2005. While the blogosphere is abuzz with the latest on Ruby, let’s ask ourselves how, exactly, Ruby programming is conducive to an educational environment

Do YOU want us to continue with the Ruby Challenge for Newbies?

RubyLearning has been conducting the monthly Ruby Programming Challenge for Newbies for over a year now and so far 11 challenges have been completed. The 12th Challenge is in progress. All this was possible due to the extensive support we got from Rubyists across the world.

RPCFN: Cycle Tracks - 12

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

RPCFN: Cycle Tracks (#12)

– By David Griffiths

Today, we complete one year of Ruby Programming Challenge for Newbies. RubyLearning is grateful to all the Ruby experts and participants who have actively helped make these challenges interesting and popular.

Clojure Tips from the Experts

RubyLearning wrote to a lot of experts, gathering their best tips on Clojure. The tips are still coming in, but here are some to get you started with. Feel free to add your own tips in the comments section or send the same to satishtalim [at] gmail.com. Enjoy! Antonio Cangiano Find him on Twitter. His Blog. When learning a new programming language, I find Project Euler to be an invaluable source of self-contained, increasingly more challenging exercises.

Dmitry Lipovoi Winner RPCFN - 10

RPCFN: The Game of Life - 11

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: The Game of Life (#11) By Elise Huard About Elise Huard Elise Huard is based in Brussels, Belgium and is the owner of Jabberwocky, a solutions company mostly focused on Rails. She has worked with a few other technologies before falling in love with Rails and Ruby about 3 years ago and going freelance to work with Ruby full time. She contributes to open source projects as much as she can, and has given talks at a few Ruby and Rails conferences.

Benoit Daloze Winner RPCFN - 9

In this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Benoit Daloze of Belgium, winner of the ninth Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies. Satish>> Welcome Benoit and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self? Benoit>> I would first like to thank RubyLearning for all they have done. I am a 19 year old student in first bachelor in computer sciences (at UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve).

RPCFN: Business Hours - 10

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Business Hours (#10) By Ryan Bates About Ryan Bates Ryan Bates has been involved in web development since 1998. In 2005 he started working professionally with Ruby and Rails and is now best known for his work on Railscasts, the free Ruby on Rails screencast series. Ryan has this to say about the challenge: Sometimes when working in a structured framework environment such as Rails it is easy to forget about the fundamentals of Ruby and how to organize code.

Paul Barry Winner RPCFN - 8

RPCFN: Interactive Fiction - 9

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Interactive Fiction (#9) – By Avdi Grimm About Avdi Grimm Avdi Grimm is a husband, father, software cultivator living in southern Pennsylvania, USA. He has been been working with the Ruby language for almost ten years, and is still finding new reasons to love it. He is the author of NullDB, Hammertime, AlterEgo, HookR and numerous other Rubygems and has contributed code to Gemcutter, UtilityBelt, the DataMapper/SimpleDB adapter, and other projects.

RPCFN: XML Transformer - 8

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: XML Transformer (#8) – By Jamie van Dyke About Jamie van Dyke Jamie van Dyke has been using Ruby and Rails since the beginning of 2005, has contributed significantly to the Rails documentation and code base, as well as running his own Rails business and being responsible for building Engine Yard’s European support team. Jamie is now the CTO over at Boxedup. Jamie has this to say about the challenge: This challenge is ideal for both beginner and advanced users.

Dmitriy Nagirnyak Winner RPCFN - 7

Guillaume Petit Winner RPCFN - 6

In this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Guillaume Petit of France, winner of the sixth Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies. Satish>> Welcome Guillaume and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self? Guillaume>> Thanks Satish for the opportunity. My name is Guillaume Petit a 26 year old nomad who sets off on a journey in the world of programming languages and has not come back yet!

RPCFN: Broadsides - 7

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Broadsides (#7) – By James Edward Gray II About James Edward Gray II James Edward Gray II was called into the principal’s office in high school for writing a black jack program on his calculator and beaming it to all the math students almost 20 years ago. He’s been tinkering with little code challenges ever since. After discovering Ruby, he formalized this process by creating the Ruby Quiz.

RPCFN: Fair Distribution - 6

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Fair Distribution (#6) – By John Trupiano About John Trupiano John Trupiano (twitter) is the co-founder of SmartLogic, the premiere Ruby development team in Baltimore, Maryland. He is an active member in the technology and business communities in the mid-Atlantic region. He is highly involved with the local Ruby user group (Bmore on Rails) and recently organized the first ever Maryland TechCrawl, a show and tell event showcasing the exciting and innovative technologies being developed in the region.

RPCFN: Mazes - 5

RubyLearning wishes all its readers and their friends and families a happy, healthy 2010. Thanks to everyone for the support and encouragement this year. It’s been a fun and rewarding year and we do appreciate all that you contribute to this site.

Aleksey Gureiev Winner RPCFN - 4

RPCFN: Ruby**Fun 4

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Ruby**Fun (#4) By Michael Kohl About Michael Kohl Michael Kohl (Twitter / blog) in his day job, works as an IT systems engineer in Vienna, Austria. He fell in love with Ruby in 2003 or so, maintained various Ruby-related packages for Gentoo Linux from 2004-2006 and started being an assistant teacher for RubyLearning.org in early 2009. Besides all things Ruby his interests include mathematics, literature, travelling, foreign languages, (functional) programming languages (e.g.

Todd Huss Winner RPCFN - 3

RPCFN: Short Circuit - 3

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Short Circuit (#3) – By Gautam Rege About Gautam Rege Gautam Rege (twitter / blog) is based in Pune, one of the busiest IT hubs in India. He has done his computer engineering from Pune Institute of Computer Technology (PICT) and passed out in the year 2000. After working for a few services based companies like Zensar and Cybage he got exposure to product companies like Veritas (now Symantec).

Charles Feduke Winner RPCFN - 2

Felipe Elias Philipp Winner RPCFN - 1

RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight - 2 repost

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Average Arrival Time For A Flight (#2) – By Chris Strom Thank you for the very encouraging response to the first-ever “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)“. The second Ruby challenge is from Chris Strom. About Chris Strom Chris Strom (twitter / blog) in his day job, is the Director of Software Engineering for mdlogix, a small company in Baltimore, Maryland. They develop software that manages clinical research trials and associated data.

RPCFN: Shift Subtitle 1

Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies RPCFN: Shift Subtitle (#1) – By Fabio Akita After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly ( bi-weekly / every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” in Ruby. Thanks to YOU, the Ruby community, people like Fabio Akita and companies like Locaweb who make all of this possible.

RPCFN: Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies

After a very encouraging response to our poll from YOU, the readers of the RL blog, RL is happy to announce the first-ever fortnightly (every 14 days) “Ruby Programming Challenge For Newbies (RPCFN)” that starts on Friday, 25th Sept. 2009. What Is The RPCFN? The RPCFN is a fortnightly (every 14 days) programming challenge for Ruby Newbies in the spirit of the Ruby Quiz. A new RPCFN will be posted on this RubyLearning blog every alternate Friday, starting 25th Sept.

Poll: Ruby Problems for Beginners and Prizes

Many RubyLearning participants wrote in asking RubyLearning to start a weekly post containing a problem to be solved using Ruby. A problem will be posted here every week / fortnight and anyone is free to offer their solution (the solution should be clear-cut, follow Ruby conventions and still be easy to understand) as a comment to the blog post. A small panel will evaluate the solutions received and decide the best amongst them all.

Interview: Author Peter Cooper

Our Book Promotion: “Beginning Ruby 2nd Edition” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for active participation. The coolest thing?

Book Promotion: Beginning Ruby 2nd Edition

RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Beginning Ruby 2nd Edition” by author Peter Cooper.

Blake Mizerany: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the last installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Carlos Gabaldon: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the eight installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra. Satish>> Carlos Gabaldon, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based?

Julio Javier Cicchelli: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the seventh installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

What are the Twelve Rules of Sinatra?

Jeremy Evans tells us his thoughts on

Nick Plante: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the sixth installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Chris Strom: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the fifth installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Karel Minarik: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the fourth installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Graham Ashton: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the third installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Jeremy Evans: How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the second installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

Book Promotion: Ruby on Rails for Microsoft Developers

Book Promotion: Ruby on Rails for Microsoft Developers RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Ruby on Rails for Microsoft Developers” by author Antonio Cangiano. The general idea of a book promotion is that it gives the participants a chance to ask relevant questions, interact with the author of the book and in the process possibly win a copy of the book, all for free! Here are the details: Promotion Period: 14 to 16 July 2009.

How do I learn and master Sinatra?

Welcome to the first installment on the RL blog, of a mini series – “How do I learn and master Sinatra?” – by top Rubyists using Sinatra. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Sinatra developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face on how to learn and master Sinatra.

20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra - Do you?

20+ Rubyists are using Sinatra – Do you? With Sinatra you can quickly create your own tiny web-applications in Ruby and write lots of small services. RubyLearning caught up with some Rubyists working with Sinatra and asked them as to why, how and where they use Sinatra. Aaron Quint I’ve been using Sinatra all over the place. With Vegas I’ve been using it as a way to provide simple web interfaces to existing code.

Interview: Author Gregory Brown

Our Book Promotion: “Ruby Best Practices” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for active participation. The coolest thing? Author Gregory Brown will be on site to answer questions! Click here for more details. Here, in this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Gregory Brown. Satish Gregory, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based? Gregory I’m a Ruby hacker that tends to spend a lot of time on free software.

Book Promotion: Ruby Best Practices

Book Promotion: Ruby Best Practices RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Ruby Best Practices” by author Gregory Brown. The general idea of a book promotion is that it gives the participants a chance to ask relevant questions, interact with the author of the book and in the process possibly win a copy of the book, all for free! Here are the details: Promotion Period: 30 June to 2 July 2009.

Interview: Author Eldon Alameda

Our Book Promotion: “Foundation Rails 2” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for active participation. The coolest thing? Author Eldon Alameda will be on site to answer questions! Click here for more details. Here, in this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to Eldon Alameda. Satish Eldon, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based? Eldon I’m originally from California, but have been residing in Kansas City for the last 11 years.

Book Promotion: Foundation Rails 2

Book Promotion: Foundation Rails 2 RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Foundation Rails 2” by author Eldon Alameda. The general idea of a book promotion is that it gives the participants a chance to ask relevant questions, interact with the author of the book and in the process possibly win a copy of the book, all for free! Here are the details: Promotion Period: 16th to 18th June 2009.

Interview: Author David Black

Our Book Promotion: “The Well-Grounded Rubyist” starts today. Win one of four books to be given out for active participation. The coolest thing? Author David A. Black will be on site to answer questions! Click here for more details. Here, in this brief interview, Satish Talim of RubyLearning talks to David A. Black. Satish David, could you tell us something about yourself – your background, where you are based? David I’m from Connecticut originally, and I live in New Jersey.

Book Promotion: The Well-Grounded Rubyist

RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “The Well-Grounded Rubyist” by author David Black.

Book Promotion: Programming Ruby 1.9

Book Promotion: Programming Ruby 1.9 RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Programming Ruby 1.9” by author Dave Thomas. The general idea of a book promotion is that it gives the participants a chance to ask relevant questions, interact with the author of the book and in the process possibly win a copy of the book; all for free! Here are the details: Promotion Period: 2nd to 4th June 2009.

Interview: Author Dave Thomas

Our Book Promotion: “Programming Ruby 1.9” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for active participation. The coolest thing?

Book Promotion: Head First Rails

RubyLearning is pleased to announce the promotion of the book “Head First Rails” by author David Griffiths.

Interview: Author Jeremy McAnally

Our Book Promotion: “Ruby in Practice” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for participation. The coolest thing?

Interview: Author Steve Pugh

Our first ever Book Promotion: “Wicked Cool Ruby Scripts” starts soon. Win one of four books to be given out for participation. The coolest thing? Author Steve Pugh will be on site

SapnaSolutions Transforming Pune City into a Rails Hub

Nick Adams is the CTO and Co-Founder of SapnaSolutions. SapnaSolutions is on a mission of transforming Pune city into a Ruby on Rails hub.

Can YOU suggest new course contents?

We’re rapidly expanding our course offerings here at RubyLearning, trying to keep up with the enormous and ever-growing interest in “everything” Ruby. We have recently introduced four new courses

Interview - Michael Morin Creator of Using Twitter with Ruby Course

The first ever free, online “Using Twitter with Ruby” course starts 18th April 2009 at RubyLearning.org. Satish Talim of RubyLearning caught up with Micheal Morin, the creator of this course, and talked to him in this interview.

Interview: Adam Wiggins on Heroku

On the eve of the first ever online “Introduction to Sinatra” course, Satish Talim and Victor H. Goff III of RubyLearning caught up with Adam Wiggins and talked to him on Heroku (pronounced her-OH-koo), in this interview.

Who are the Top 5 Twitter Graded Rubyists?

Interview: Chris Wanstrath of GitHub

On the eve of the first ever free, online course on “Git and GitHub”, Satish Talim of RubyLearning caught up with Chris Wanstrath and talked to him, in this short interview. Satish Talim>> Welcome, Chris and thanks for taking out time to share your thoughts. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self? Chris Wanstrath>> I’m a Ruby and JavaScript programmer living in San Francisco, CA.

Will RubyLearning be present at the Shorty Awards Acceptance Ceremony?

The votes have been cast and the Shorty Awards have come to an end. The official results are in, and RubyLearning is a winner of the Shorty Award in the education category. RubyLearning represented by its nearly 7000 participants from over 140 countries are delighted and so am I. For those of you unfamiliar with The Shorty Awards, they have been given to “the best producers of short content in 2008.” And by short content, they mean 140 characters or less.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Ryan Bates

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the last installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. This week, we’re happy to have Ryan Bates from USA.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Thibaut Barrere

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. This week, we’re happy to have Thibaut Barrere from France.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Josh Susser

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Ilya Grigorik

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Peter Cooper

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Chris Matthieu

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Ezra Zygmuntowicz

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Bruce Tate

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Jonathan Conway

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Guy Naor

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

50+ Rubyists to Follow on Twitter

The response to an earlier post “Famous Ruby Personalities: Who do you recommend?” was very encouraging and many wrote in asking for the Twitter profiles of these Famous Ruby Personalities and other Ruby developers and bloggers. But What’s Twitter? The New York Times says: Twitter is a simple messaging service that you’ve either heard about a lot or not at all. Either way, it’s a fun and useful tool, well worth trying if you want to reach potential and existing customers, employees or employers.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Chris O'Sullivan

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters

Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Jay Fields

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Stuart Halloway

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Dr Nic Williams

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the next installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by James Edward Gray II

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters Welcome to the second installment of the weekly interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

Little Known Ways to Ruby Mastery by Jamie van Dyke

A weekly series from the Ruby Masters We’re excited to launch a new interview series on the RL blog – “Path to Ruby Mastery” – by top trainers and developers in the Ruby community, from across the globe. The interview series will provide insight and commentary from these notable Ruby trainers and developers, with the goal of facilitating and providing answers to the questions Ruby beginners face. We welcome your suggestions for interviewees and questions.

David Flanagan talks to RubyLearning

O’Reilly Media, Inc. is a strong supporter of RubyLearning.org and recently announced a 50% discount, for the participants of the FORPC101 course, on their book “The Ruby Programming Language” by David Flanagan, Yukihiro Matsumoto. Satish Talim of RubyLearning recently caught up with David Flanagan who was kind enough to spare time answering questions posed by RubyLearning. Satish Talim David, a warm welcome to you. For the benefit of the readers, could you tell us something about your self?

"AkitaOnRails" Advises A Young Ruby Beginner

Fabio AkitaFabio Akita is a Brazilian Rails enthusiast, also known online as “AkitaOnRails”. He regularly write posts on his own blog and had published the very first book tailored for the Brazilian audience called “Repensando a Web com Rails”. He is now a full-time Ruby on Rails developer working as Brazil Rails Practice Manager for the Utah company Surgeworks LLC.

"AkitaOnRails" On Anatomy of Ruby Blocks/Closures

Fabio Akita’s “AkitaOnRails” series at RubyLearning.com, for would-be Ruby developers, has been quite a hit. Today in another article, Fabio talks in depth about Ruby’s Blocks/Closures, This is a rather long article but well worth the time invested in reading it.

"AkitaOnRails" On Ruby Symbols

RubyLearning recently caught with Fabio Akita from Brazil and got his viewpoint on one of the vexing areas for beginners in Ruby – Symbols.

Advice For Ruby Beginners 3

Advice For Ruby Beginners 2

Advice For Ruby Beginners 1

The popularity of Ruby grows exponentially and with that, more and more people are learning the language. Recently, 400+ would-be Ruby developers from around the world registered for the Free Ruby Lessons at RubyLearning.com and more keep joining everyday. Most Ruby beginners have a plethora of questions related to the language; opportunities in Ruby; Ruby’s future.

David Black Interview: Talking to RubyLearning.com

Today, I had the good fortune to talk to David Black the author of the very popular book “Ruby for Rails“, on behalf of all the RubyLearning.com members. I have been recommending his book to one and all and if you have not read it yet, do buy yourself a copy. Hello David, and welcome to RubyLearning.com. Why don’t we start with a little bit of your background? I’m a self-taught computer programmer, currently specializing in Ruby and Rails.